EAA - The Spirit of Aviation

Vol. 2, No. 5  MAY 2009

Welcome to Bits and Pieces, EAA's e-newsletter and monthly information digest for builders and fliers in Canada. We encourage you to forward your copy to your aviation friends and invite them to subscribe.

Jack DueckWith spring's arrival and the promise of longer, warmer days ahead, many of us are seeing a significant increase in the number of hours spent in and around our airplanes. This month we touch on several timely topics, such as a new development in the pending new ELT regulations and what effect they'll have on your ability to legally fly. For those who venture into the U.S., we trust you're up to speed on the new U.S. regulations for general aviation aircraft crossing the border. But just in case, read the story below. Other stories: There's a great new benefit for Young Eagles (and yes, it's applicable to Canada as well!); a reactivated chapter that's prompted two others to organize a three-chapter fly-out next month; and of course, AirVenture Oshkosh and EAA's planned activities for celebrating the 100th anniversary of Canadian flight. All this and more, including a look back at "The Dean of Canadian Amateur Builders," in Bits and Pieces. - Jack Dueck, Editor

spacer
406 MHZ ELT REQUIREMENT PUT IN 'HOLDING PATTERN'
Those of us who were worried that not having an installed 406 MHz emergency locator transmitter (ELT) on their airplanes would prevent them from flying legally can rest a little easier, as Minister of Transport John Baird put implementation of the new rule in a holding pattern earlier this month. Transport Canada was moving forward with the new rule to require 406 MHz units on board within two years of February 1, 2009. Exemptions to allow for a transition period were in the works. Instead the Minister sent the rule back to the CARAC (Canadian Aviation Regulatory Advisory Council) for revision to address lingering concerns. Read more 406 MHZ ELT REQUIREMENT PUT IN 'HOLDING PATTERN'
spacer
NEW U.S. BORDER CROSSING REQUIREMENTS IN EFFECT MAY 18
We've been hearing the word, "eAPIS" a lot lately, and so have those pilots who fly into the U.S. regularly or occasionally. So what is eAPIS? It's an acronym (aviation loves its acronyms) that stands for Electronic Advance Passenger Information System, and beginning Monday, May 18, anyone flying into or out of the U.S. will have to use it to gain clearance to cross the border. It's all part of the "Advance Information on Private Aircraft Arriving and Departing the United States" final rule issued late last year by the U.S. Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP), which requires private aircraft operators or their designees to electronically transmit advance notice and passenger/crew manifest information through the eAPIS no later than 60 minutes before departure. It's very important that those of us planning to fly into the U.S. - to AirVenture Oshkosh this year, for example - become fully educated on the new border crossing requirements. Failure to comply with the new regulations could result in a fine of $5,000 for a first offense, and a $10,000 fine and/or jail time for subsequent violations. Read more NEW U.S. BORDER CROSSING REQUIREMENTS IN EFFECT MAY 18
spacer
EAA, SPORTY'S PARTNERSHIP ENHANCES EAA YOUNG EAGLES' INTRODUCTION TO FLIGHT
With EAA, more than 1.4 million youths around the world have gotten their first taste of flying through a Young Eagles flight. Now Sporty's Pilot Shop is partnering with EAA to provide the tools they'll need to take the next steps in pursuing their interest in aviation. Through this partnership, new Young Eagles will receive a special logbook for recording this and subsequent aviation experiences, plus they'll receive an access code to the Sporty's Online Complete Pilot Training Course. Both the logbook and the entire flight-training course will be free of charge to Young Eagles. Read more

Editor's Note: Canadian Young Eagles qualify for this program. The Ground School is based on the FAA curriculum, which is not the same, but has a strong similarity to our Canadian syllabus.

Tom Poberezny and Hal Shevers
Tom Poberezny and Hal Shevers

spacer
SEVERAL AIRCRAFT SEVERELY DAMAGED BY 'WEAK' TORNADO
Nearly two-dozen airplanes suffered damage - half of them total losses - at Rockcliffe Airport in the Ottawa region when what Environment Canada determined was a "weak tornado" lashed through the area on the evening of April 26. Members of the Rockcliffe Flying Club, who were attending an annual event at the airport during the storm, worked together to cleaned up the mess the next day. See photos of the wreckage. Weak Tornado at Rockcliffe Airport in the Ottawa region
spacer
CANADIAN PLANE THIEF UNDERGOING EVALUATION
Adam Dylan Leon, the 31-year-old flight student who in early April stole a Cessna 172 from his Thunder Bay, Ontario, flight school and illegally flew the aircraft into the United States, is currently undergoing psychiatric evaluation to determine if he's fit to stand trial. The Thunder Bay resident was reportedly hoping to be shot down by the American military in a bizarre suicide-by-fighter-jet attempt, but could face up to 10 years in a U.S. federal prison for his unauthorized flight. Wisconsin Air National Guard F-16s pursued the plane after it crossed the border on April 7, but soon determined the wayward Cessna to not be a terrorist threat. Leon eventually made an off-airport landing on a road near Elsinore, Missouri. He was apprehended and charged with interstate transportation of a stolen aircraft and illegal entry to the U.S. in federal court in St. Louis. The evaluation could take a month or more.
spacer
CRASH CLAIMS LIFE OF LSA COMPANY PRESIDENT
Explorer Aeronautique, maker of the Ecoflyer and Private Explorer aircraft, suffered a tremendous loss on April 27 when company President Bernard LaFerriere, 56, was killed in a crash during his flight back from Sun 'n Fun to Trois-Rivieres, Quebec. According to the Syracuse Post-Standard, Laferriere had stopped at the Norwich, New York, airport that afternoon to wait for the heavy winds to subside. He left Norwich at around 4:30 p.m. and was later reported missing by aviation workers at a Boston area airport. A landowner discovered LaFerriere's remains and the plane wreckage on Tuesday afternoon in a remote, wooded area. The company debuted the Ecoflyer last year at AirVenture and the airplane was profiled in the October 2008 edition of EAA Sport Pilot & Light-Sport Aircraft magazine. We send our condolences to Bernard's family and friends.

CRASH CLAIMS LIFE OF LSA COMPANY PRESIDENT
The Ecoflyer on display at AirVenture 2008

spacer
THE DUTCH-CANADIAN CONNECTION: COURAGE AND TULIPS
We said it last month and we'll say it again: If you have not yet subscribed to the Vintage Wings newsletter, Vintage News, you should do so without delay. In the latest issue, editor Dave O'Malley pays tribute to WWII Flying Officer George Langille of St. John, New Brunswick, but not in a way you might expect. Langille was shot down and killed while flying a dangerous attack mission in his Hawker Typhoon over an area in Holland known as the Gelderland. O'Malley tells the fascinating story of how a group of Dutch citizens have remembered his ultimate sacrifice - and how the nation remains ever grateful for Canada's providing sanctuary to the Royal Family of the Netherlands during the war, and for the sacrifice of thousands of Canadian lives during its liberation from Nazi tyranny. Read the story THE DUTCH-CANADIAN CONNECTION: COURAGE AND TULIPS
spacer
JOINT FLYOUT PLANNED FOR EAA CHAPTERS' 63, 154, 1410
With the rebirth of EAA Winnipeg (Lyncrest) Chapter 63, its members were eager to begin flying activities under their new banner. So Greg MacGillivray of chapters 63 (Lyncrest) and 1410 (High River) got together with his Winnipeg and Regina (Chapter 154) friends to plan a suitable kick-off to the 2009 flying season: A joint chapter event midway between Winnipeg and Calgary. Following a flurry of e-mails between Jack Niema of Lyncrest, Perry Casson of Regina, and Greg, plans came together quickly. Regina was the approximate midway point, and Vic Zubot's private strip at Disley, Saskatchewan, came up. Read more JOINT FLYOUT PLANNED FOR EAA CHAPTERS' 63, 154, 1410
spacer
OSHKOSH ACTIVITIES INCLUDE BILLY BISHOP GOES TO WAR
Further progress has been made on activities to commemorate the centennial of Canadian aviation at AirVenture 2009, since the outline schedule was published in the last issue of Bits & Pieces. We can now confirm that several aircraft are expected to attend from Vintage Wings Canada, including the stunning P-40 Kittyhawk that recently joined the collection from New Zealand, and an amphibious de Havilland Canada Beaver.

Details are also available of an invitation for our Canadian visitors to attend an exclusive performance of the Canadian musical play, Billy Bishop Goes to War. This will take place on the evening of Monday, July 27, in fine surroundings of the Eagle Hangar of the EAA AirVenture Museum.

Written by John MacLachlan Gray and Eric Peterson, Billy Bishop Goes to War is one of the most famous and widely-produced plays in Canadian theatre, dramatizing the life of Canadian World War I fighter pilot Billy Bishop. The one-night-only performance will star David Cescarini of Milwaukee’s Next Act Theater Company, who performed the play to rave reviews at Oshkosh in 2002. Doors will open at 7 p.m. and the performance will begin at 8 p.m. Tickets are available at no charge, but seating is limited. To reserve your seat, please e-mail Jane Smith at jsmith@eaa.org. and include how many seats you need.

Bit and Pieces Poll
spacer
OUR CANADIAN AVIATION HERITAGE: HAROLD MARQUETTE
From the EAA Sport Aviation published in July, 1966 comes the story of Harold Marquette, EAA 16073, Kitchener, Ontario - "The Dean of Canadian Amateur Builders." While Harold was a self-taught master aircraft builder, what was interesting is he never became a pilot himself. "His joy is in watching a set of plans transformed gradually into an aircraft that will fly." Read the story

EAA members can access any issue of their organization's past magazines (1953-2006). To do your own searches, or browse through a back issue, visit http://members.eaa.org (log-in required) and click on the Sport Aviation Archive image like the one at right. EAA has also recently launched Sport Aviation-Digital Edition - an electronic version of the magazine.

EAA Sport Aviation


Subscribe

We welcome your comments and suggestions to EAABitsandPieces@eaa.org.
All content, logos and pictures are the property of EAA
Copyright © 2009 - EAA, Inc.
3000 Poberezny Road, Oshkosh , WI 54902
800-236-4800 :: 920-426-4800

Disclaimer/Privacy policy