EAA - The Spirit of Aviation

Vol. 2, No. 6  JULY 2009

Jack DueckWelcome to Bits and Pieces, EAA's e-newsletter and monthly information digest for builders and fliers in Canada. We encourage you to forward your copy to your aviation friends and invite them to subscribe.

We' a little over a week away from AirVenture Oshkosh, and plans are finalized for the Oshkosh celebration of Canada's Centennial of Flight. (Click here for the details.) One disappointment: Russell Air Group's Gerry Bettridge called to say the Messerschmitt Bf 109E definitely cannot come to Oshkosh this year because further maintenance issues with the wing were found and repairs cannot be made in time. That was the airplane that sustained damage last month after impacting a flag pole near the end of the RAG runway.

I encourage all Canadians attending this year to stop by the International Visitors Tent, located right next to the new control tower (the big yellow tent-you can't miss it!), to say hello and visit. - Jack Dueck, Editor

spacer
PILOTS COMMENT ON NEW BORDER CROSSING REGS
Some Tips for the Oshkosh-bound
BITS AND PIECES POLL
The new U.S. border crossing regulations that recently went into effect will lead me to:
  • Fly into the U.S. less often.
  • Not fly into the U.S. any more.
  • Fly into the U.S. as much as I
    always have.
  • Fly into the U.S. more often.
  • I don't fly into the U.S.

Vote now!

Last month's poll results: More than 80 percent of those participating in last month's poll said "Throw the book at him!" regarding the damage done to a historic airplane, Russell Air Group's meticulously restored Messerschmitt Bf 109E.

The numbers of Canadians who flew to the Arlington Fly-In last week was down significantly - by about 50 percent, according to statistics from Arlington's temporary U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) facility on the field. Barb Tolbert, fly-in executive director, said that decrease was largely attributed to the new U.S. border crossing regulations and the eAPIS system. There were plenty of Canadian attendees as usual, but many chose to drive, not fly, across the border.

"Customs officials were very helpful and cooperative, but it certainly appears that the new border crossing regulations in the United States and the eAPIS system had a detrimental effect on aircraft arrivals from north of the border," she said. "The people I spoke with who did fly down said that it was not as difficult as some were making it out to be, but pilots seemed to deal with the large changes in the procedures by not dealing with them."

One Canadian who flew in described it as "One more thing to do on top of everything else," rating about a "3" on the "hassle scale" of 1-10. Another said that the people the new regulations are trying to keep out would never comply with the new regulations. "So what good is it?"  Read more

spacer
FLIGHT STUDENT INDICTED FOR STEALING C-172, FLYING INTO U.S.
A Canadian man accused of stealing a single-engine plane from a college in Thunder Bay, Ont., in April and piloting it across three U.S. states was indicted by a federal grand jury in St. Louis in June. Adam Dylan Leon, 31, was charged with interstate transportation of a stolen aircraft; importation of a stolen aircraft, and illegal entry. He faces a maximum of 20 years and six months in prison. He allegedly told officials that the act was an attempt at suicide. The Cessna 172 flew across Lake Superior and over Michigan, Wisconsin and Illinois before landing in Missouri with about 30 minutes' worth of fuel left in the tank. Read more
spacer
REDFORD HENRY MULOCK - CANADA'S FIRST ACE
Red' Mulock may have been the second Canadian to join the Royal Naval Air Service, (RNAS) but it was a notoriety for 'firsts' that dominated his flying. He has rightfully been called Canada's most versatile and experienced airman of the Great War 1914-1918. (l)

Born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, in 1885, Redford Henry Mulock graduated in engineering from McGill University in Montreal. Like many patriotic Canadians, he joined the colours in August 1914.   Although holding a Lieutenant's commission in the Militia, Mulock enlisted in the First Contingent of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) as a Corporal in order to get overseas sooner. Following training with the Canadian Field Artillery at Valcartier he shipped out to England that October. Read more

Handley

spacer
FIRST FLIGHT OF THE SILVER DART REPLICA 5
Found hidden away in this month's Light Flight (The Ultra Light Pilot's Association's) Newsletter, was this newsworthy item. - Jack Dueck

With pilot Ed Lubitz at the controls, the Silver Dart Replica 5 flew under its own power for the first time early this morning June 13, 2009 at 07:46 from the grass runway at Lubitz field near Kitchener, Ontario.

Ed writes: We were conducting taxi test with a run at 15 mph followed by a second run. During the second run, with the power at approximately half-throttle, the air speed was increased to 20 mph. The elevator was deflected down to see if there was enough control authority to lift the nose wheel clear of the runway. The nose wheel lifted clear of the ground and the increased angle of attack allowed the mains to follow. The aircraft rose into the air about 3 feet and was airborne for approximately 500 ft. Read more

Silver Dart
spacer
WEBSITE ALL ABOUT 100 YEARS OF POWERED FLIGHT IN CANADA
As a part of the ongoing celebrations for this year's flight centennial in our country, Wings Magazine has created a fine website that provides a comprehensive review of flight's first 100 years here. I encourage you to check it out. Silver Dart
spacer
THE BEAT GOES ON
Sixty-five years after the end of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan, pilots are still being trained at Portage La Prairie - the times have changed, but not the camaraderie, hard work and the shenanigans - reports 2nd Lieutenant Barry John Dickson, a volunteer with Vintage Wings Canada. Click here for the story on the Vintage Wings Canada website.
spacer
FROM THE ARCHIVES
A Twenty-Year Dream Takes to the Air
Fifty years ago, a story about a first-time builder's persistence and patience appeared in the July 1959 issue of Sport Aviation. Stan Dizk's story, A Twenty-Year Dream Takes to the Air, describes Don Simmons, of Moncton, New Brunswick, and his long-held dream to build his own airplane. That year was our 50th anniversary of flight celebration, and Don used that as inspiration to complete his Baby Ace, Zephyr. The airplane flew for the first time on February
13, 1959 - 10 days to spare. Click here to read the story.
spacer
HOW-TO BOOK FOR SHEET METAL BUILDING
EAA’s continuing “how-to” series of educational materials for building your own aircraft now includes, Sheet Metal Building Basics, written by longtime builder and SportAir instructor (and your editor of Bits and Pieces) Jack Dueck. Jack is a sheet metal construction expert and serves on the EAA Homebuilt Council, the EAA Canadian Council, and is an EAA Technical Counselor for his home Chapter 1410 in High River, Alberta, Canada.

“I see a gap between the dreamer - making the initial decision to build - and the confident builder working along on his aircraft project," said the author. “This book is my effort to help bridge that gap for that novice builder.”  Read more

spacer


Subscribe

We welcome your comments and suggestions to EAABitsandPieces@eaa.org.
All content, logos and pictures are the property of EAA
Copyright © 2009 - EAA, Inc.
3000 Poberezny Road, Oshkosh , WI 54902
800-236-4800 :: 920-426-4800

Disclaimer/Privacy policy