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EAA - The Spirit of Aviation

Vol. 2, No. 9  SEPTEMBER 2009

Jack DueckWelcome to Bits and Pieces, EAA's e-newsletter and monthly information digest for builders and fliers in Canada. We encourage you to forward your copy to your aviation friends and invite them to subscribe.

Our highlight this month is the EAA Inter-chapter Fly-out to Disley, Saskatchewan the weekend of August 29 and 30 involving EAA Chapters 63, 1410, and 154.

The flight out to Disley in my 1947 Luscombe wasn't without excitement either. We had an unscheduled fuel stop at the little hamlet of Niedpath.

Ales Burton, chief flight instructor, Mount Royal College, Calgary, wrote an excellent and timely piece on Mid-Air Collisions.

And finally, under 'Aviation History' I found this interesting article about Japanese Underwater Aircraft Carriers.

 Enjoy!  - Jack Dueck, Editor

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FUEL STARVATION EXAMINED AS CAUSE OF CANADIAN TIGER MOTH CRASH
The Transportation Safety Board of Canada is considering fuel starvation as the primary cause of the crash of a de Havilland Tiger Moth last month. The WWII-era Canadian primary trainer from the Vintage Wings of Canada Museum crashed during a maintenance test flight. Museum pilot Howard Cook was flying the aircraft to test a recently repaired tail-wheel when it crashed shortly after take-off from Ottawa/Gatineau Airport in Quebec, Canada. Cook, a British pilot, sustained multiple injuries including a broken back, ankle, wrist and ribs. The aircraft received substantial damage. Read more
Howard Cook
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INTERPROVINCIAL FLY-IN BRINGS THREE CHAPTERS TOGETHER AT DISLEY
How much fun can a few folks have at the end of a fine summer?

A bunch if they attended the first annual, EAA Western Chapter Fly-In at Disley, Saskatchewan, in late August. An intrepid group of aviators and aviation enthusiasts led by Jeff Seaborn from High River Chapter 1410, Jack Neima of Winnipeg Chapter 63, and Perry Casson of Regina Chapter 154 departed their home bases Saturday morning enroute to Disley, SK, where they were welcomed by their gracious hosts Vic and Breeze Zubot. 

Vic’s private 2200 foot turf strip is located one-half mile east of Disley and about 20 miles northwest of Regina, just beside the Q’Appelle Valley. Read more

BITS AND PIECES POLL

What are your flying plans after the so-called summer flying season?
What flying season? I fly the year ‘round.
Fly as much as possible, but only when the weather is picture perfect.
Dreaming of flight while working on my project.
Hangar flying only - hurry spring! 

Vote now!

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BITS AND PIECES READER HELPS EDITOR AFTER UNSCHEDULED FUEL STOP
The engine sputters and loses RPM! Instinctively, I change from the right to the left fuel tank. Instant power! What was that all about?

Greg MacGillivray and I are on our fly-out flight to Disley Saskatchewan. We had fueled up in Medicine Hat about an hour ago, and my Luscombe could not have possibly burned through 15 gallons (US) of fuel. Anyway, the engine is now purring so we continue on.

Suddenly, silence! Isn't it amazing how quiet things get at 5500 ft. ASL when the engine in an aircraft shuts down!

I try the right tank again and get a faint pop, and then only silence. Priming doesn't help, and I say to Greg; "Guess we're going down!"  Read more

Unscheduled Fuel Stop
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MIDAIR COLLISIONS: KNOWING WHAT THE TRUE RISKS ARE

Several years ago I was climbing out of Minneapolis in C-FWXD, our beautiful Cessna 206. It was a hot, bumpy afternoon and I was heading generally northwest. With the blinding sun on my left, I was attempting to get what sun protection was possible by hiding behind the vertical cabin member on the left of the windscreen.

Suddenly, out of my left sight perspective I saw the image of a large, very near, low-wing aircraft crossing my pathway from left to right. By instant instinct reaction, I threw the aircraft in a tight right downward maneuver, saving the day and scaring the dickens out of my three passengers. This was way too close for comfort. The other pilot never saw me since I was below him and on his right. I was not looking to my left in order to avoid the sun. Conditions were perfect for a potential for a midair collision.
Read more

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AIRFIELD UNDER THE SEA
Japan's Submersible I-400 Aircraft Carriers

In many ways HIJMS I-400 was decades ahead of her time. She was the world’s largest submarine with a length of 400-ft and a surface displacement of 3,530 tons. Above her main deck rose a 115-ft. long, 12-ft diameter, hangar housing three torpedo-bombers. These float planes were rolled out through a massive hydraulic door onto an 85-ft pneumatic catapult, where they were rigged for flight, fueled, armed, launched, and after landing alongside, lifted back aboard with a powerful hydraulic crane. The I-400 was equipped with a snorkel, radar, radar detectors, and capacious fuel tanks that gave her a range of 37,500 miles: One and a half times around the world. She was armed with eight torpedo tubes, a 5.5-in 50-cal deck gun, a bridge 25mm antiaircraft gun, and three triple 25 mm A/A mounts atop her hangar. The advent of guided missiles and atomic bombs transformed her from dinosaur to an overspecialized undersea menacing strategic threat. Read more

Airfield Under the Sea
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FROM THE ARCHIVES
Building a Dream
Bill Pomeroy of Norval, Ontario, won the "Best RV-3 Award" at Oshkosh19'75, and penned this cover story for the February 1976 issue of Sport Aviation about his project. Incidentally, the airplane was also named the Best Canadian Homebuilt for 1975. Read the story here.
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