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EAA - The Spirit of Aviation

Vol. 2, No. 11 DECEMBER 2009

Welcome to Bits and Pieces, EAA's e-newsletter and monthly information digest for builders and fliers in Canada. We encourage you to forward your copy to your aviation friends and invite them to subscribe.

We start this month's Bits and Pieces with an article penned by EAA Chapter 1410 High River President Jeff Seaborn. Jeff clearly articulates "that something" we as aviators all hold so dear: "Connecting With Friends."

Last week, I met with Rob Erdos, chief test pilot for the National Research Council in Ottawa. He had just written "Bouncing Clouds", his test flight in Ed Russell's Bf-109E. You will recall that this aircraft was scheduled to fly at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh this summer, but was involved in a flight incident with an obstructing pole put into the flight path by a neighbor. 
 

Jack Dueck
In earlier issues of Bits and Pieces, we covered several stories of Canada's Centennial of Flight celebrations with the flight of a replica of McCurdy's Silver Dart in Baddeck, Nova Scotia. On October 14, this aircraft was fittingly awarded the J.A.D. McCurdy Trophy by the Air Force Association of Canada in Trenton, Ontario.

We introduce Mike Bourget, EAA Canadian council member from the Ottawa region. We want you to meet all of the council members and will carry a biographical outline on each one monthly. We also list the council members for your contact information.

Our flight safety article this month looks at "Low-Altitude Turns and Margin-Over-Stall" issues.

And finally, enjoy a look back into our archives.

Enjoy!  - Jack Dueck, Editor

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CONNECTING WITH FRIENDS
Connecting with friends. That's what we hear about EAA AirVenture Oshkosh. It's all about connecting with friends. In the last couple of months, I've had the opportunity to connect with all sorts of friends through aviation.

Of course, there was AirVenture. With hundreds of thousands of visitors, youíd think it would be impossible to even find someone you know. But itís amazing; we were continually running into friends and constantly making new friends. Itís an event that you have to experience. Read more

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"BOUNCING CLOUDS" FLYING A RARE BF-109 
"Achtung Spitfire", I heard in a ridiculous German accent. I smiled. The voice was my own. My head swiveled within the tight confines of the Bf-109 cockpit, looking for the attacker. There it was, above and behind, waiting to pounce upon me from out of the sun! This particular "Spitfire" (pronounced Schpitfire) looked like an unassuming summer cumulus cloud, but I turned to meet the attack nonetheless.

Test Pilot Rod Erdos gives us a personal tour of the only flying "Emil" Messerschmitt Bf-109E in the world in an article he wrote for Vintage Wings of Canada. Read more

Bouncing Clouds
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SILVER DART REPLICA RECEIVES AWARD
100 years ago the Silver Dart, piloted by J.A.D. McCurdy, made the first powered airplane flight in Canada. On October 14, 2009 the team that built and flew a Silver Dart Replica was awarded the J.A.D. McCurdy Trophy by the Air Force Association of Canada in Trenton, Ontario. The team included the grandson of J.A.D. McCurdy. Read more
BITS AND PIECES POLL
Do you plan on flying your plane to the Winter Olympics?

Yes
No
Too much paperwork

Vote now!

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KNOW YOUR EAA CANADIAN COUNCIL 
EAA's organizational structure is made up of several affiliations, such as Warbirds, International Aerobatic Club, Vintage Aircraft Association, National Association of Flight Instructors , as well as several special-interest groups, including the Homebuilt Aircraft Council, the Ultralight or Light-Sport Aircraft Council, and the Canadian Council. During the last few years, EAA has spent a significant amount of time and resources revamping the Canadian Council to better serve Canadian EAA members.

This month - meet Mike Bourget.  Read more

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FLIGHT SAFETY; LOW ALTITUDE TURNS & MARGIN-OVER-STALL
One early morning an experienced pilot is so thrilled by the smooth air, that on impulse he throws the aircraft into a tight 60-degree bank shortly after takeoff. The airspeed is registering a substantial margin over clean, wings-level stall, and he is totally surprised to hear the stall warning over cockpit noise and earphone attenuation. Instinctively and through training, his immediate reaction was to push on the yoke while simultaneously leveling the wings. Read more
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WINTER OLYMPICS AIRSPACE RESTRICTIONS MAKE PILOTS SLALOM THROUGH GATES
Snow will not be the only thing covering Canada during the upcoming winter Olympics; restricted airspace will also blanket southwestern British Columbia and portions of the U.S. Pacific northwest for nearly two months during the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games. From January 29 to March 24, pilots must follow extensive procedures to continue to carry out general aviation flights in and around Vancouver according to the AIP CANADA supplement:

For safety and security reasons Class F restricted airspace in the form of two (2) conjoined Olympic Rings will be established within a 30 nautical mile (NM) radius of the Vancouver International Airport (CYVR) and Whistler Athleteís Village, respectively. 

The adjoining rings will cover 120 miles of airspace from the Orcas Islands south of the international border to the northwest end of Carpenter Lake. Read more

Olympic Airspace
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PARK IT, TRUCKERS! ICE PILOTS GET REALITY SHOW
A 13-part reality television series taped in the Canadian Northwest Territories shows what it's like to work for Buffalo Airways. Flying DC-3 and Curtiss C-46 Commandos, among other vintage workhorses, the crews struggle against bone-chilling cold and mechanical failures to bring essential supplies to the far-flung outposts of northern Canada. Ice Pilots NWT is broadcast on History Television at 10 p.m. Eastern, 9 p.m. Central. You can read more about it at www.IcePilots.com.
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FROM THE ARCHIVES: TWENTY YEAR DREAM TAKES TO THE AIR
Twenty years ago Don Simmons (EAA 1666 of Moncton, New Brunswick Canada) lay in bed with a damaged knee, gazing intently at a photo of a Heath Parasol, homebuilt by a friend in Toronto, Ontario. There and then he promised himself that some day he'd build a plane comparable to that smart looking sport job. Throughout the years that followed, no matter where he went, he kept picking up spare parts to add to his stockpile at home, which he vowed he'd some day turn into his dream ship. Read about Simmon's triumph with the building of a Baby Ace from the July 1959 issue of Sport Aviation.

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