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EAA - The Spirit of Aviation

Vol. 3, No. 1 JANUARY 2010

Welcome to Bits and Pieces, EAA's e-newsletter and monthly information digest for builders and fliers in Canada. We encourage you to forward your copy to your aviation friends and invite them to subscribe.

This first issue of Bits and Pieces for 2010 includes two news announcements for the New Year.

First, in the article on Innovative Wings, this energetic young Western Canadian firm is sought out to "partner up" with the big players in attempting to beat existing records in time-to-climb and raw speed runs with a 1200 shaft horsepower, turbine-driven propeller aircraft. This is planned for EAA AirVenture Oshkosh this year. 

Jack Dueck
We also have information about EAA SportAir Workshops for Canadian enthusiasts this coming spring.

Our "Flight Safety" article looks at the whys and means of Carb Heat as a flight-risk mitigating issue.

We introduce you to our second EAA Canadian Council member, Paul Dyck of Winnipeg.

If you're driving down a secondary highway near Cayley, Alberta, you will see a circle formed of ten old Anson fuselages. We remember them flying our skies in years past.

And from the Archives, we learn about "Those Darn Canadians" as American "Buck" Hilbert discovers there is something other than speed skating to cheer about in Vancouver.

Enjoy!  - Jack Dueck, Editor

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LEGEND BUILT TO BE FASTEST TO NEW HEIGHTS
In 1999 Shane Daly, an aeronautical engineering technologist, and Marty Abbott, an ex-Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CF-104 pilot, shared a vision of a dream performance aircraft.

Marty, a local attorney and businessman, wanted something a lot faster than what was available and familiar, and he liked the work Shane was doing. So the idea of a high performance, turbine powered, personal, amateur-built aircraft was born. A handshake agreement was made, Innovative Wings was incorporated, and the dream, Legend C-GUTT, was born. Read more

Legend
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FLIGHT SAFETY - CARB HEAT - WHY?
An American friend, building a Sonex amateur-built aircraft, is at the building stage where his efforts are directed at the firewall-forward, fitting an AeroVee (Volkswagen) engine. I recently asked him if he was providing carb heat for his aircraft. His reply: "No. It's not a requirement in the U.S., and besides, it's not necessary!" 

Many American amateur-built aircraft with carbureted engines are imported into Canada each year, and surprisingly, many do not have provision for carb heat installed.  Read more

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EAA SPORTAIR WORKSHOPS RETURN TO CANADA THIS SPRING
EAA will again host a number of SportAir Workshops this spring in the Calgary region. These popular workshops are designed to help you get the most benefit and satisfaction out of building, flying, and maintaining your homebuilt aircraft.

Courses Being Offered:

  • Sheet Metal Basics
  • Electronics/Avionics
  • Amateur-Built Aircraft Inspections
  • Test-Flying and Developing the POH for Your Homebuilt

See an overview video of EAA SportAir Workshops.

  Read more

BITS AND PIECES POLL
With commercial air travel coming under increased security and with the additional hassle endured by you, how would you feel about using personal aviation more as a means of travel?

I will definitely fly myself whenever possible.
It will not make much of a difference to my travel plans.
I will probably fly less personally since the hassle extends to personal and recreational flying as well, especially cross-border flights.

Vote now!

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KNOW YOUR EAA CANADIAN COUNCIL 
EAA's organizational structure is made up of several affiliations, such as Warbirds, International Aerobatic Club, Vintage Aircraft Association, National Association of Flight Instructors , as well as several special-interest groups, including the Homebuilt Aircraft Council, the Ultralight or Light-Sport Aircraft Council, and the Canadian Council. During the last few years, EAA has spent a significant amount of time and resources revamping the Canadian Council to better serve Canadian EAA members.

This month - meet Paul Dyck.  Read more

Paul Dyck
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AVRO ANSON
Many of us remember this venerable bird from the WWII and Post War days, and are familiar with commercial applications using reconfigured Ansons. Ansons were plentiful during the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP). The one drawback in restoring an Anson is their one-piece wooden spar, and consequently many Ansons were sold as surplus aircraft and used for parts, but never returned to service. I came across this scene of ten Anson carcasses placed in a circle in a farmerís field near Cayley, Alberta, and it brought back memories. Read more Avro Anson
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FROM THE ARCHIVES: 
The Winter Olympics will begin soon, and Vancouver, B.C., will be in the spotlight. If tickets to the sporting events are too tough to get, there are a few aviation delights nearby that may make you cheer just as loud. In the spring 2003 issue of Sport Aviation Association's To Fly magazine, member "Buck" Hilbert discovered just that when he visited Vancouver on vacation from below the 49th parallel. Read the article. From the archives


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