View as webpage

Bits & Pieces eNewsletter
 
Vol. 5, No. 9 December 2012

Ian Brown FROM THE EDITOR - NEW AIRCRAFT INSPECTION CONTRIBUTOR, CANADIAN MOSQUITO FLIES AGAIN!
By Ian Brown, Editor - Bits and Pieces, EAA 657159


When I was a newly minted private pilot, around the summer of 1998 I took my nephew, Jordan, on his first flight. Wind the clock forward 14 years and my nephew is now a commercial pilot flying Twin Otters for Montreal-based Air Inuit. He had an exciting flight recently, having been the co-pilot on a flight to pick up a mother in labour. Here is the happy mom with her new baby. I hope to have an interview with Jordan in a future issue. Read more

Canadian Mosquito FIRST FLIGHT OF THE WORLD'S ONLY FLYING MOSQUITO
By Ian Brown, Editor - Bits and Pieces, EAA 657159


A Canadian classic wartime aircraft, the British-designed de Havilland Mosquito, was languishing in the Canadian Museum of Flight just waiting for some heavy investment! Jerry Yagen of the Fighter Factory Collection in Virginia, United States, purchased the aeroplane and had it shipped to New Zealand, where it was completely restored to flying condition by AvSpecs Ltd. It recently landed in Auckland on its maiden flight from Ardmore and was the featured aircraft at the air show there on September 27. Read more

AIRCRAFT INSPECTION TECHNIQUES FOR HOMEBUILDERS
By Bill Evans, President - EAA Chapter 266, EAA 794228


This series of articles is for homebuilders, and it began as a PowerPoint presentation, which in turn began with two very different aircraft accidents involving homebuilts. I had friends who knew the owner pilots of these airplanes. Bob Curtis of Sun 'n Fun International Fly-In & Expo at Lakeland, Florida, said, "If you do a forum, pick a topic you know something about." Those accidents made the decision an easy one. Read more

Young Eagles YOUNG EAGLES IN CANADA
By Brian O'Lena, Manager, EAA Young Eagles and Youth Pathways


Since 1992 the EAA Young Eagles program has flown over 1.7 million kids ages 8 to 17 around the world. In Canada, 3,246 volunteer EAA member pilots have flown 86,916 Young Eagles. To all of our EAA members in Canada who have flown or volunteered with the Young Eagles program, thank you! To those of you who haven't participated yet, what are you waiting for? Read more

EAA CANADIAN COUNCIL REPORT
By Jack Dueck, Chairman - EAA Canadian Council, EAA 337912


As you may know, the Canadian Council was revitalized and rebuilt in 2008 to offer liaison between EAA Headquarters and our membership. The council is comprised of five members. Current members are: Denis Browne, Jack Dueck, Paul Dyck, Lloyd Richards, and Ed Lubitz. Read more

FLIGHT PLANNING SESSION A SUCCESS
By John Carley, EAA 1088721


To become updated on the new "Flight Plan 2012" information and to review flight planning in general, the Carman Flyers Group at Carman (South), CJS7, in Manitoba held an updating session on flight planning on November 13 at its new flight centre. To present flight planning information and to mediate the varying opinions about flight planning, Lance Appleford of Mountain City Aviation was asked to conduct this training session. Six flyers from the Carman area attended. Our topic of flight planning must have been a popular choice as our local group was honoured to have 11 flyers from Lyncrest make the trip to Carman to attend. Read more

Test Flight Card TEST-FLIGHT CARD, BEST GLIDE SPEED
By Jack Dueck, EAA 337912


Our last test flight allowed us to develop the best rate of climb (Vy) and the best angle of climb (Vx) for our RV-9A. And the previous test flight provided our indicated airspeed to calibrated airspeed correction figures. Now with our newborn knowledge of these data, we can establish the best glide speed for our aircraft.

The best glide speed can be described as the least altitude lost per distance traveled. If we lose power, then determining our best glide speed will give us the greatest horizontal distance that we can travel and hopefully our best chance of selecting an appropriate off-airport landing site should it become necessary. Read more

Santa Visit SANTA PAYS SPECIAL VISIT TO LYNCREST

On a snowy Saturday December 8 morning, some 50 children and parents were sipping hot chocolate in the Lyncrest Airport Flight Centre in Manitoba, when suddenly a familiar sound could be heard on the radio: "Ho, Ho, Ho!" Sure enough, Santa Claus was coming in for a landing! Everyone pressed against the windows to see the jolly old elf land on Runway 36 in a red and while 1956 Piper Pacer on skis.

As was explained to the children, "Rudolph" was in need of some rest, so Santa and two of his elves left the reindeer at the North Pole during this one last visit before Christmas Eve. After he double-checked his "naughty and nice" list, neighbours Candice and Cory Sliworsky invited Santa to stay for a couple of hours as photos were taken with the children. Everyone agreed it was the most fabulous visit by Santa they ever experienced! When Santa got back into the Pacer to depart CJL5 and fly back to the North Pole, everyone cheered to say goodbye. After all, he's got a lot to do to get ready for the big night! (Photo credit: Robert Dearden)

ELECTRONICS CORNER - 406 MHz ELTs
By Ian Brown, Editor - Bits and Pieces, EAA 657159

The 406 megahertz ELT (emergency location transmitter) situation in Canada is maturing. The many ELTs shown on the Transport Canada site are approved for use.

Your editor's recent RV-9A flip-over resulted in his 121.5 ELT deploying. In the heat of the moment, it took an hour to disarm it. In the intervening period three separate reports were received from pilots having heard the transmission, resulting in search and rescue at CFB Trenton making rescue preparations.

If you haven't already invested in a 406 ELT, you can rest assured that your existing ELT should still be heard, even if it is not being actively monitored via satellite.

Aviation Snips BUILDERS' TIP: AVIATION SNIPS

As you probably know, aviation snips are the right tool for most aviation sheet metal cutting, at least at the homebuilding level. There are red left-handed, green right-handed, and yellow straight snips. You can, of course, use them with either hand, and the handedness refers to what curves you can follow. Green snips will allow you to follow a right-handed curve (which is just a left-handed curve started from the other end!). Port/red and starboard/right seem to be the convention here. Read more

AVIATION WORDS: WORD OF THE MONTH - ABSOLUTE

You may not have thought of this, but the use of the word "absolute" in aviation can be confusing. An aircraft's "absolute ceiling" is the maximum altitude it can fly above sea level when the temperature and barometric pressure at sea level are standard, but the phrase "absolute altitude" refers to an aircraft's height above terrain, not above sea level. For height above sea level, which we use routinely, the absolute is dropped and we simply use "altitude" or "true altitude".

Of course, actual air temperature and pressure at sea level affect the absolute measure of altitude. The height of obstacles in our path, such as mountains, are measured above mean sea level, so knowing our altitude accurately is important. Above 18,000 feet, the altimeter is set to 29.92 inches hg "pressure altitude" for aircraft separation purposes, but that only applies to a select few of our readers.

Hopefully that makes everything clear. It's absolutely true!

From the Archive FROM THE ARCHIVES: A PLEA FROM THE PRESIDENT
By Ian Brown, Editor - Bits and Pieces, EAA 657159

There are both similarities and contrasts between our present issue of Bits and Pieces and this abstract from the December 1962 EAA Sport Aviation. EAA Founder and then-president Paul Poberezny notes in that issue's Homebuilder's Corner column the problem in getting contributions, writing "...the number of pages presented every month depends on the amount of funds available." In contrast, since our Canadian contributors submit their articles to the editor gratis, there is no such concern here. Read more

C-Plan


Join EAA   |   Renew Membership   |   EAA Forums   |   EAA Newsletters   |   EAA.org

EAA Facebook EAA Twitter EAA RSS