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F-100F Super Sabre to Make First Visit to Oshkosh

  • Dean “Cutter” Cutshall’s F-100F will be the first Super Sabre to ever appear at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh.
    Dean “Cutter” Cutshall’s F-100F will be the first Super Sabre to ever appear at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh.
  • The Super Sabre is the first U.S. Air Force fighter plane capable of supersonic speed in level flight.
    The Super Sabre is the first U.S. Air Force fighter plane capable of supersonic speed in level flight.
  • The F-100 is powered by a Pratt & Whitney J57 SER turbojet engine.
    The F-100 is powered by a Pratt & Whitney J57 SER turbojet engine.

April 15, 2015 - A North American F-100F Super Sabre, the first U.S. Air Force fighter plane capable of supersonic speed in level flight, will participate in EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2015 – the first known appearance of an F-100 at the annual Oshkosh fly-in and convention.

Owned by Dean “Cutter” Cutshall, EAA Lifetime 229783/Warbirds of America 5757, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, the aircraft will take part in warbird air show performances and also be the subject of a Warbirds in Review session. Details will be announced as they are confirmed.

The Super Sabre, nicknamed “Hun” - short for hundred - is the first of the “Century Series” collection of USAF jet fighters that also includes the McDonnell F-101 Voodoo, Convair F-102 Delta Dagger, Lockheed F-104 Starfighter, Republic F-105 Thunderchief, and Convair F-106 Delta Dart.

The F-100 served with the Air Force from 1954 to 1971 and with the Air National Guard until 1979. Powered by a Pratt & Whitney J57 SER turbojet engine, it was the Air Force’s primary close air support jet during the Vietnam War until being replaced by LTV A-7 Corsair IIs. F-100s also served in other NATO air forces and with other U.S. allies.

After original delivery to the Air Force in 1958, Cutshall’s airplane, S/N 56-3948, was in the U.S. inventory until 1974 when it was delivered to the Turkish air force. Fifteen years later it returned to the U.S. to Tracor Industries, Mojave, California, and was sold once more before Cutshall acquired the plane in 1996.

He restored it to flight status with the markings of legendary Air Force ace fighter pilot Francis “Gabby” Gabreski wing commander’s aircraft. Gabreski is credited with destroying 34½ enemy aircraft during his 26-year career in the Air Force in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. Gabreski is one of only seven U.S. fighter pilots to achieve ace status in two wars (WWII and Korea).

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