Hands, Mind, and Heart

What started as a handful of passionate enthusiasts has developed into a major force—and a significant component—of the aircraft industry.

General Operation

There Is A Modus Operandi for Everything

6/1/1996 12:00:00 AM By Tony Bingelis (originally published in EAA Sport Aviation, June 1996)

You probably are not aware that your flying buddies can often identify you, even at a distance, from the way you habitually operate your aircraft (your modus operandi).

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Engine Storage

12/1/1994 12:00:00 AM By Bill Claxon (originally published in EAA Vintage Airplane, December 1994)

It is generally known that when the aircraft engine is not run for long periods of time the idle time has a detrimental effect on the engine. In fact, long periods of idleness vastly reduces TBO. Cylinder wall corrosion is one of the problems.

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Jacking Aircraft Safely

11/1/1994 12:00:00 AM By Tony Bingelis (originally published in EAA Sport Aviation, November 1994)

The letter starts out . . . "I’m in need of jacking technique and hardware. Basically I need to lift one wheel so I can remove the wheel and tire. What I currently do is ‘painful’ and time consuming. Once the aircraft fell off the jack.

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Aircraft Tiedowns

12/1/1993 12:00:00 AM

If You Fly In

7/1/1993 12:00:00 AM By Tony Bingelis (originally published in EAA Sport Aviation, July 1993)

The lure and call of the wild blue yonder is hard to resist when you have a brand new homebuilt in the stable and your mandatory test flight hours have finally been flown off.

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Control Surface Flutter Problems

7/1/1979 12:00:00 AM By Tony Bingelis (originally published in EAA Sport Aviation, July 1979)

FLUTTER? WELL, SIR, flutter is what a flag does wildly on the flag pole on those days when it is too windy for you to fly. But to better relate it to our subject, it should be described as a potentially destructive vibration or buffeting of an aircraft due to an out-of-balance condition of one or more of its control surfaces.

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No Radio No Transponder Operations in Class D Airspace in a Mode C Veil

Wow, that title is a mouthful!! But it's true; aircraft can be operated, under certain circumstances, without a radio or a Mode C transponder within Class D airspace that's within a mode C veil. Rules and regulations often have exceptions, and the rules we call the Federal Air Regulations (FARs) are no different.

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